I came across a very interesting post here with a presentation from Chris Messina on life streaming. The approach taken in the presentation, especially the references to activity theory and activity systems made me to think about life streaming as a means of tracing and reflecting on informal learning in digital environments. In other words, can life streaming contribute to making explicit and recording learning as a social, interactional and an active process. While the majority of workplace learning is informal and so highly situated, such learning can also be unreflective. So, I suppose, my thinking is that where people work in the sort of (digital) environments being discussed by Chris, can life streaming be instrumental in enabling reflective and potential expansive learning by providing the mediating artefacts that activity theory suggests can support such processes and outcomes.

I can see lots of practical (and probably theoretical!) problems here – so was interested in this post from Graham Attwell on PLEs that refers to Ben Hammersley‘s budding as:

This sounds very much like part of a Personal Learning Environment to me: a tool which can allow us both to capture contextual learning where and when it happens and to repurpose it for presentation in different media …

Different media could include personal learning logs, blogs, reports, presentations, lessons learnt reports, wikis and so on. In other words, there is no reason for such micro-learning objects as assets of informal learning should, necessarily “melt in to air” once its immediate and situated utility is over.

Is it possible to use life streaming to trace micro-objects as memes for their ‘stickiness’, calls to action, capacity to spread, to be viral as a way to study, understand and reflect on implicit learning in practice?

Advertisements